Mental Health Literacy and Eating-Disordered Behavior: Beliefs of Adolescent Girls Concerning the Treatment of and Treatment-Seeking for Bulimia Nervosa

  • J. M. Mond
  • P. Marks
  • P. J. Hay
  • B. Rodgers
  • C. Kelly
  • C. Owen
  • S. J. Paxton
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10964-006-9087-9

Cite this article as:
Mond, J.M., Marks, P., Hay, P.J. et al. J Youth Adolescence (2007) 36: 753. doi:10.1007/s10964-006-9087-9

Abstract

This research examined the “mental health literacy” of adolescents concerning eating-disordered behavior. A vignette describing a fictional 16-year old female meeting diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa was presented to 522 female high school students, followed by a series of questions concerning treatment of and treatment-seeking for the problem described. Results indicated that primary care practitioners, mothers and close female friends were most highly regarded as potential sources of help. Self-help interventions, including the use of vitamins and minerals, were also highly regarded, whereas participants were less positive about the benefits of mental health specialists and ambivalent about the use of anti-depressant medication. Most participants believed that the problem described would be difficult to treat, and that relapse was likely even given appropriate treatment. An additional finding of note was that among participants with a high level of eating disorder symptoms (n=36, 6.9%), recognition of an eating problem was poor. We conclude that beliefs likely to be conducive to low and/or inappropriate treatment-seeking for eating problems may be common among adolescent girls. In addition, the findings suggest that prevention programs for the eating disorders need to target not only at-risk individuals, but also individuals in their immediate social environment.

Keywords

AdolescentsMental health literacyEating disordersTreatment-seeking

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Mond
    • 1
  • P. Marks
    • 2
  • P. J. Hay
    • 1
  • B. Rodgers
    • 3
  • C. Kelly
    • 4
  • C. Owen
    • 5
  • S. J. Paxton
    • 6
  1. 1.School of MedicineJames Cook UniversityTownsvilleAustralia
  2. 2.NSW Centre for Eating & Dieting DisordersCentral Sydney Area Health ServiceSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.National Centre for Epidemiology and Population HealthThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  4. 4.Orygen Research CentreParkvilleAustralia
  5. 5.Medical Education UnitMedical School, Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  6. 6.School of Psychological ScienceLa Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia