Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 52, Issue 4, pp 1120–1130

HPV Vaccine Decision-Making and Acceptance: Does Religion Play a Role?

  • Rachel C. Shelton
  • Anna C. Snavely
  • Maria De Jesus
  • Megan D. Othus
  • Jennifer D. Allen
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10943-011-9553-x

Cite this article as:
Shelton, R.C., Snavely, A.C., De Jesus, M. et al. J Relig Health (2013) 52: 1120. doi:10.1007/s10943-011-9553-x

Abstract

We conducted a web-based survey among 476 white, Black, and Hispanic parents or caregivers with daughter(s) between the ages of 9–17 to better understand how religion influences HPV vaccine acceptance. Catholic parents were more likely than nonaffiliated parents to have already vaccinated their daughters (vs. being undecided) (OR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.06, 10.06). Parents with frequent attendance at religious services were more likely than parents who do not attend services to have decided against vaccination (vs. being undecided) (OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.25, 6.84). Directions for research and implications for interventions are addressed.

Keywords

HPV vaccineReligionVaccine acceptanceCancer prevention

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel C. Shelton
    • 1
  • Anna C. Snavely
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maria De Jesus
    • 4
  • Megan D. Othus
    • 5
  • Jennifer D. Allen
    • 3
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Sociomedical SciencesMailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Center for Community-Based ResearchDana-Farber Cancer InstituteBostonUSA
  4. 4.School of International ServiceAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA
  5. 5.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  6. 6.Department of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA