The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 89–108

It’s Your Game…Keep It Real: Can Innovative Public Health Prevention Research Thrive Within a Comparative Effectiveness Research Framework?

Authors

    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
  • Christine M. Markham
    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
  • Melissa F. Peskin
    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
  • Kimberly Johnson
    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
  • Paula Cuccaro
    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
  • Susan R. Tortolero
    • The University of Texas Prevention Research Center, The University of Texas Health Science CenterHouston School of Public Health
Research Methods and Practice

DOI: 10.1007/s10935-013-0293-4

Cite this article as:
Shegog, R., Markham, C.M., Peskin, M.F. et al. J Primary Prevent (2013) 34: 89. doi:10.1007/s10935-013-0293-4
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Abstract

The federal comparative effectiveness research (CER) initiative is designed to evaluate best practices in health care settings where they can be disseminated for immediate benefit to patients. The CER strategic framework comprises four categories (research, human and scientific capital, data infrastructure, and dissemination) with three crosscutting themes (conditions, patient populations, and types of intervention). The challenge for the field of public health has been accommodating the CER framework within prevention research. Applying a medicine-based, research-to-practice CER approach to public health prevention research has raised concerns regarding definitions of acceptable evidence (an evidence challenge), effective intervention dissemination within heterogeneous communities (a dissemination and implementation challenge), and rewards for best practice at the cost of other promising but high-risk approaches (an innovation challenge). Herein, a dynamic operationalization of the CER framework is described that is compatible with the development, evaluation, and dissemination of innovative public health prevention interventions. An effective HIV, STI, and pregnancy prevention program, It’s Your Game…Keep It Real, provides a case study of this application, providing support that the CER framework can compatibly coexist with innovative, community-based public health prevention research.

Keywords

Comparative effectiveness researchPrevention researchInnovationSexual healthYouth

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013