The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 5–35

Adolescent Neurological Development and its Implications for Adolescent Substance Use Prevention

Authors

    • Department of Cardiology, Leonard M. Miller School of MedicineUniversity of Miami
  • Seth J. Schwartz
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of MedicineUniversity of Miami
  • Guillermo Prado
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of MedicineUniversity of Miami
  • Ana E. Campo
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Center for Family Studies, Leonard M. Miller School of MedicineUniversity of Miami
  • Hilda Pantin
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of MedicineUniversity of Miami
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10935-007-0119-3

Cite this article as:
Lopez, B., Schwartz, S.J., Prado, G. et al. J Primary Prevent (2008) 29: 5. doi:10.1007/s10935-007-0119-3

Abstract

Recent technological advancements have facilitated the study of adolescent neurological development and its implications for adolescent decision-making and behavior. This article reviews findings from the adolescent neurodevelopment and substance use prevention literatures. It also discusses how findings from these two distinct areas of adolescent development can complement each other and be used to build more developmentally appropriate interventions for preventing adolescent substance use. Specifically, a combination of child-centered and family-based strategies is advocated based on extant neurological and prevention literature. Editors’ strategic implications: Researchers are encouraged to take up the authors’ challenge and study the links between adolescent neurological development/decision making ability and the long term efficacy of comprehensive interventions for preventing adolescent substance use.

Keywords

Substance use preventionAdolescenceNeurological development

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008