Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 377–392

Secondary Prevention of Work Disability: Community-Based Psychosocial Intervention for Musculoskeletal Disorders

  • Michael J. L. Sullivan
  • L. Charles Ward
  • Dean Tripp
  • Douglas J. French
  • Heather Adams
  • William D. Stanish
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10926-005-5944-7

Cite this article as:
Sullivan, M.J.L., Ward, L.C., Tripp, D. et al. J Occup Rehabil (2005) 15: 377. doi:10.1007/s10926-005-5944-7

Abstract

Introduction: One objective of the present research was to examine the degree to which psychological risk factors could be reduced through participation in a community-based psychosocial intervention for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. A second objective was to examine whether psychosocial risk reduction had an effect on the probability of return to work. Methods: Participants were 215 Workers Compensation Board claimants with work-related musculoskeletal disorders who had been absent from work for an average of approximately 7 months (M = 28.8 weeks, range = 4–100 weeks) and were referred to a community-based multidisciplinary secondary prevention program in Nova Scotia, Canada. Results: In the current sample, 63.7% of participants returned to work within 4 weeks of treatment termination. The percentage reductions in targeted risk factors from pretreatment to posttreatment were as follows: catastrophizing (32%), depression (26%), fear of movement/re-injury (11%), and perceived disability (26%). Logistic regression indicated that elevated pretreatment scores on fear of movement and re-injury (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.35–0.95) and pain severity (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.43–0.96) were associated with a lower probability of return to work. A second logistic regression addressing the relation between risk factor reduction and return to work revealed that only reductions in pain catastrophizing (OR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.07–0.46) were significant predictors of return to work. Conclusions: The results of the present study provide further evidence that risk factor reduction can impact positively on short term return to work outcomes. Significance: Outcomes of rehabilitation programs for work disability might be improved by incorporating interventions that specifically target catastrophic thinking. Community-based models of psychosocial intervention might represent a viable approach to the management of work disability associated with musculoskeletal disorders.

Keywords

psychosocial risk factorsoccupational disabilitysecondary preventioncatastrophizingrehabilitationwork-related musculoskeletal disordersreturn to work

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. L. Sullivan
    • 1
  • L. Charles Ward
    • 2
  • Dean Tripp
    • 3
  • Douglas J. French
    • 4
  • Heather Adams
    • 5
  • William D. Stanish
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MontrealMontrealCanada
  2. 2.V.A. Medical CenterTuscaloosaAlabama
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MonctonMonctonNew Brunswick
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MontrealMontrealCanada
  6. 6.Department of SurgeryDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada