Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 475–483

Creativity in Medical Education: The Value of Having Medical Students Make Stuff

  • Michael J Green
  • Kimberly Myers
  • Katie Watson
  • MK Czerwiec
  • Dan Shapiro
  • Stephanie Draus
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10912-016-9397-1

Cite this article as:
Green, M.J., Myers, K., Watson, K. et al. J Med Humanit (2016) 37: 475. doi:10.1007/s10912-016-9397-1

Abstract

What is the value of having medical students engage in creative production as part of their learning? Creating something new requires medical students to take risks and even to fail--something they tend to be neither accustomed to nor comfortable with doing. “Making stuff” can help students prepare for such failures in a controlled environment that doesn’t threaten their professional identities. Furthermore, doing so can facilitate students becoming resilient and creative problem-solvers who strive to find new ways to address vexing questions. Though creating something new can be fun, this is not the main outcome of interest. Rather, the principle reason we recommend devoting precious curricular time to creative endeavors is because it helps medical students become better doctors.

Keywords

Medical education Creativity Teaching Humanities 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J Green
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kimberly Myers
    • 1
  • Katie Watson
    • 3
  • MK Czerwiec
    • 3
  • Dan Shapiro
    • 1
  • Stephanie Draus
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of HumanitiesPenn State College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicinePenn State College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  3. 3.Medical Humanities & Bioethics Program Feinberg School of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Academic Affairs College of Naturopathic MedicineUniversity of BridgeportBridgeportUSA