Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 189–196

Is Iodine A Gatekeeper of the Integrity of the Mammary Gland?

Authors

    • Instituto de NeurobiologíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de México
    • Instituto de NeurobiologíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • Brenda Anguiano
    • Instituto de NeurobiologíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • Guadalupe Delgado
    • Instituto de NeurobiologíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10911-005-5401-5

Cite this article as:
Aceves, C., Anguiano, B. & Delgado, G. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia (2005) 10: 189. doi:10.1007/s10911-005-5401-5

Abstract

This paper reviews evidence showing iodine as an antioxidant and antiproliferative agent contributing to the integrity of normal mammary gland. Seaweed is an important dietary component in Asian communities and a rich source of iodine in several chemical forms. The high consumption of this element (25 times more than in Occident) has been associated with the low incidence of benign and cancer breast disease in Japanese women. In animal and human studies, molecular iodine (I2) supplementation exerts a suppressive effect on the development and size of both benign and cancer neoplasias. This effect is accompanied by a significant reduction in cellular lipoperoxidation. Iodine, in addition to its incorporation into thyroid hormones, is bound into antiproliferative iodolipids in the thyroid called iodolactones, which may also play a role in the proliferative control of mammary gland. We propose that an I2 supplement should be considered as an adjuvant in breast cancer therapy.

Keywords

mammary glandiodinedeiodinasebreast cancerantioxidantlipoperoxidation

Abbreviations:

H2O2

hydrogen peroxide

I2

molecular iodine

I

iodide

I+

iodinium

I0

iodine free radical

I

oxidized iodine species

IO

hypoiodite

IO3

iodate

KI

potassium iodide

LPO

lactoperoxidase

MNU

N-methyl-N-nitrosourea

NIS

sodium iodide symporter

O2

single oxygen

O2

superoxide anions

OH

hydroxyl radicals

PEN

pendrin

PPAR

peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor

ROS

reactive oxygen species

T3

triiodothyronine

T4

thyroxine

TPO

thyroperoxidase

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005