Journal of Low Temperature Physics

, Volume 151, Issue 3, pp 902–907

The SciCryo Project and Cryogenic Scintillation of Al2O3 for Dark Matter

Authors

    • Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, IPNL, UMR5822, CNRS-IN2P3Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon
  • N. Coron
    • Institut d’Astrophysique SpatialeCNRS & Université Paris Sud
  • P. de Marcillac
    • Institut d’Astrophysique SpatialeCNRS & Université Paris Sud
  • C. Dujardin
    • Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Luminescents, UMR 5620Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1
  • M. Luca
    • Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, IPNL, UMR5822, CNRS-IN2P3Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon
  • F. Petricca
    • Max-Planck-Institut für Physik
  • F. Proebst
    • Max-Planck-Institut für Physik
  • S. Vanzetto
    • Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, IPNL, UMR5822, CNRS-IN2P3Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon
  • M.-A. Verdier
    • Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, IPNL, UMR5822, CNRS-IN2P3Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon
  • the EDELWEISS collaboration
Open AccessArticle

DOI: 10.1007/s10909-008-9759-9

Cite this article as:
Di Stefano, P.C.F., Coron, N., de Marcillac, P. et al. J Low Temp Phys (2008) 151: 902. doi:10.1007/s10909-008-9759-9

Abstract

We discuss cryogenic scintillation of Al2O3. Room-temperature measurements with α particles are first carried out to study effect of Ti concentration on response. Measurements under X-rays between room temperature and 10 K confirm a doubling of light output. The integration of a scintillation-phonon detector into an ionization-phonon dark matter search is underway, and the quenching factor for neutrons has been verified.

Keywords

ScintillationCryogenicsSapphireDark matter

PACS

29.40.Mc07.20.Mc95.35.+d91.67.Pq
Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008