Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 684–695

Factors Affecting Hispanic Women’s Participation in Screening for Cervical Cancer

  • Arelis Moore de Peralta
  • Bonnie Holaday
  • James R. McDonell
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-014-9997-7

Cite this article as:
Moore de Peralta, A., Holaday, B. & McDonell, J.R. J Immigrant Minority Health (2015) 17: 684. doi:10.1007/s10903-014-9997-7
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Abstract

Hispanic women’s cervical cancer rates are disproportionately high. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as a theoretical framework to explore beliefs, attitudes, socio-economic, and cultural factors influencing Hispanic women’s decisions about cervical cancer screening. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Hispanic women 18–65 years old (n = 205) in the Upstate of South Carolina. Generalized Linear Modeling was used. Across all models, perceived threats (susceptibility and severity), self-efficacy, and the interaction of benefits and barriers were significant predictors. Significant covariates included age, marital status, income, regular medical care, and familism. A modified HBM was a useful model for examining cervical cancer screening in this sample of Hispanic women. The inclusion of external, or social factors increased the strength of the HBM as an explanatory model. The HBM can be used as a framework to design culturally appropriate cervical cancer screening interventions.

Keywords

Cervical cancer screeningPap testCervical cancerHealth Belief ModelHispanic womenCultural modifiers

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arelis Moore de Peralta
    • 1
  • Bonnie Holaday
    • 2
  • James R. McDonell
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute on Family and Neighborhood LifeClemson UniversityClemsonUSA
  2. 2.Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life, School of NursingClemson UniversityClemsonUSA