Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 1294–1298

Perceptions of Mental Illness and Related Stigma Among Vietnamese Populations: Findings from a Mixed Method Study

Authors

  • Mai Do
    • Department of Global Health Systems and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineTulane University
    • Department of Global Health Systems and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineTulane University
  • Stacy Wallick
    • Department of Global Health Systems and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineTulane University
  • Bonnie Kaul Nastasi
    • Department of PsychologyTulane University
Brief Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-014-0018-7

Cite this article as:
Do, M., Pham, N.N.K., Wallick, S. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2014) 16: 1294. doi:10.1007/s10903-014-0018-7

Abstract

Mental-illness-related (MIR) stigma is recognized as a major barrier to health care. Yet very little is known about mental illness and stigma among Vietnamese populations, or how emigration and acculturation processes might affect traditional views. Focus group discussions were conducted with Vietnamese Americans in New Orleans (Louisiana) and Vietnamese nationals in Bui Chu (Vietnam), who shared historical and cultural backgrounds, in 2010 to assess differences in their perceptions of mental illness and stigma. Results show several significant differences in mental illness perceptions between Vietnamese Americans and Vietnamese nationals, while MIR stigma seemed prevalent and understanding of mental illness was low among both groups.

Keywords

Mental illnessStigmaVietnameseVietnamese Americans

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014