Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 7–12

Characterization of Chronic Hepatitis B Cases Among Foreign-Born Persons in Six Population-Based Surveillance Sites, United States 2001–2010

  • Stephen J. Liu
  • Kashif Iqbal
  • Sue Shallow
  • Suzanne Speers
  • Elena Rizzo
  • Kristin Gerard
  • Tasha Poissant
  • R. Monina Klevens
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-014-0012-0

Cite this article as:
Liu, S.J., Iqbal, K., Shallow, S. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2015) 17: 7. doi:10.1007/s10903-014-0012-0

Abstract

National surveys indicate prevalence of chronic hepatitis B among foreign-born persons in the USA is 5.6 times higher than US-born. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded chronic hepatitis B surveillance in Emerging Infections Program sites. A case was any chronic hepatitis B case reported to participating sites from 2001 to 2010. Sites collected standardized demographic data on all cases. We tested differences between foreign- and US-born cases by age, sex, and pregnancy using Chi square tests. We examined trends by birth country during 2005–2010. Of 36,008 cases, 21,355 (59.3 %) reported birth in a country outside the USA, 2,323 (6.5 %) were US-born. Compared with US-born, foreign-born persons were 9.2 times more frequent among chronic hepatitis B cases. Foreign-born were more frequently female, younger, ever pregnant, and born in China. Percentages of cases among foreign-born persons were constant during 2005–2010. Our findings support information from US surveillance for Hepatitis B screening and vaccination efforts.

Keywords

Chinese-born Birth country HBsAg prevalence Perinatal transmission Provider screening 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (Outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. Liu
    • 1
    • 6
  • Kashif Iqbal
    • 1
  • Sue Shallow
    • 2
  • Suzanne Speers
    • 3
  • Elena Rizzo
    • 4
  • Kristin Gerard
    • 3
  • Tasha Poissant
    • 5
  • R. Monina Klevens
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.San Francisco Department of Public HealthSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Connecticut Department of Public HealthHartfordUSA
  4. 4.New York State Department of HealthAlbanyUSA
  5. 5.Oregon Health AuthorityPortlandUSA
  6. 6.Division of Viral Hepatitis, Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, National Center for Infectious DiseasesCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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