Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 822–830

Social Isolation Among Latino Workers in Rural North Carolina: Exposure and Health Implications

  • Dana C. Mora
  • Joseph G. Grzywacz
  • Andrea M. Anderson
  • Haiying Chen
  • Thomas A. Arcury
  • Antonio J. Marín
  • Sara A. Quandt
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-013-9784-x

Cite this article as:
Mora, D.C., Grzywacz, J.G., Anderson, A.M. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2014) 16: 822. doi:10.1007/s10903-013-9784-x

Abstract

Immigrant Latinos frequently experience social isolation in their receiving communities. This paper investigates the prevalence of social isolation among immigrant workers in a new settlement area and delineates the association between social isolation and physical and mental health outcomes. Interviews were conducted in Spanish with immigrant Latino manual workers (N = 743) in western North Carolina. The CES-D and the SF-12 questionnaires assessed health outcomes. A social isolation scale was used to assess degree of social isolation. Nearly 1 in 5 workers (19.5 %) reported the highest level of social isolation. Social isolation was associated with higher depressive symptoms and poorer physical and mental health, related to quality of life. Social isolation is a common experience among immigrant Latinos that may have negative implications for physical and mental health. Community outreach efforts to minimize experiences of isolation may be useful in protecting immigrant physical and mental health.

Keywords

Latino immigrant workersSocial isolationHealth

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana C. Mora
    • 1
  • Joseph G. Grzywacz
    • 2
    • 4
  • Andrea M. Anderson
    • 3
  • Haiying Chen
    • 3
  • Thomas A. Arcury
    • 2
    • 4
  • Antonio J. Marín
    • 2
  • Sara A. Quandt
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Medical Center BoulevardWake Forest School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family and Community MedicineWake Forest School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  3. 3.Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Biostatistical SciencesWake Forest School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  4. 4.Center for Worker HealthWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA