Brief Communication

Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 553-558

Community Health Center Access to Resources for their Patients with Diabetes

  • Arshiya A. BaigAffiliated withSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Email author 
  • , Cara A. LocklinAffiliated withCollege of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • , Amanda CampbellAffiliated withMidWest Clinicians’ Network
  • , Cynthia T. SchaeferAffiliated withMidWest Clinicians’ NetworkUniversity of Evansville
  • , Loretta J. HeuerAffiliated withMidWest Clinicians’ NetworkNorth Dakota State University
  • , Sang Mee LeeAffiliated withDepartment of Health Studies, University of Chicago
  • , Marla C. SolomonAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • , Michael T. QuinnAffiliated withSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago
  • , J. Martin VargasAffiliated withCommunity Action Partnership of Western Nebraska
    • , Deborah L. BurnetAffiliated withSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago
    • , Marshall H. ChinAffiliated withSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Community health center providers and staff access to resources for their Latino and non-Latino patients with diabetes is unknown. We analyzed survey data from 577 community health center providers and staff who manage diabetes from 85 sites across 10 Midwestern states. Respondents were labeled as high proportion (HP) providers if >25 % of their site’s diabetes population was Latino. HP providers were more likely than non-HP providers to have access to physician’s assistants (71 vs. 58 %) and certified diabetes educators (61 vs. 51 %), but less access to endocrinologists (25 vs. 35 %) (p < 0.05). HP providers had greater access to Spanish-speaking providers (48 vs. 26 %), on-site interpreters (83 vs. 59 %), culturally tailored diabetes education programs (64 vs. 26 %), and community outreach programs (77 vs. 52 %) (p < 0.05). Providers at HP sites reported greater access to a range of personnel and culturally tailored programs. However, increased access to these services is needed across all sites.

Keywords

Diabetes Latino Services Community health centers