Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 453–461

Perceived Discrimination and Antisocial Behaviors in Puerto Rican Children

  • Fernando Rivera
  • Irene López
  • Peter Guarnaccia
  • Rafael Ramirez
  • Glorisa Canino
  • Hector Bird
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-010-9421-x

Cite this article as:
Rivera, F., López, I., Guarnaccia, P. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2011) 13: 453. doi:10.1007/s10903-010-9421-x

Abstract

This study examined whether perceived discrimination was related to antisocial behaviors (ASB) in a probability sample of Puerto Rican children living in the South Bronx, New York and the San Juan Metropolitan area of Puerto Rico (N = 1,271). After adjusting for a host of well-known factors associated with ASB, such as sociodemographic variables (i.e., age, gender, household composition), psychosocial stressors (i.e., stressful life events, exposure to violence), and various forms of violence and abuse (i.e., coercive parental discipline, verbal, psychological, physical and sexual abuse), perceived discrimination remained a robust correlate of ASB among both samples. Findings are discussed with reference to the detrimental associations of perceived discrimination.

Keywords

Discrimination Antisocial behaviors Puerto Rican Children 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fernando Rivera
    • 1
  • Irene López
    • 2
  • Peter Guarnaccia
    • 3
  • Rafael Ramirez
    • 4
  • Glorisa Canino
    • 4
  • Hector Bird
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of Central FloridaOrlandoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyKenyon CollegeKenyonUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Health, Health Care Policy and Aging ResearchRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  4. 4.Behavioral Sciences Research InstituteUniversity of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences CampusSan JuanUSA
  5. 5.Department of Clinical PsychiatryColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA