Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 867–875

The Impact of Family History of Breast Cancer on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Early Detection Practices of Mexican Women Along the Mexico-US Border

  • Yelena Bird
  • Matthew P. Banegas
  • John Moraros
  • Sasha King
  • Surasri Prapasiri
  • Beti Thompson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-010-9418-5

Cite this article as:
Bird, Y., Banegas, M.P., Moraros, J. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2011) 13: 867. doi:10.1007/s10903-010-9418-5

Abstract

Rates of breast cancer (BC) have increased in Mexico, with the highest incidence and mortality rates observed in the northern Mexican states. This study aimed to describe the BC knowledge, attitudes and screening practices among Mexican women with and without a family history of BC residing along the Mexico-US border, and identify factors associated with screening behaviors. One hundred and twenty eight Mexican women aged 40 and older completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, family history, and screening practices. There were no significant differences between Mexican women with and without a family history. Over 60% of women in both groups had never had a mammogram/breast ultrasound, and more than 50% had never obtained a clinical breast exam. Age, marital status, insurance, and breast cancer knowledge significantly influenced BC screening behaviors among Mexican women. Further research is needed to examine other key factors associated with screening utilization, in effort of improving BC rates.

Keywords

Breast cancerFamily historyScreeningKnowledgeMexican

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yelena Bird
    • 1
  • Matthew P. Banegas
    • 2
  • John Moraros
    • 1
  • Sasha King
    • 3
  • Surasri Prapasiri
    • 4
  • Beti Thompson
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Public HealthUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Health ServicesUniversity of Washington School of Public Health, Division of Public Health Sciences/Cancer Prevention Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  3. 3.AlbuquerqueUSA
  4. 4.Las CrucesUSA