, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 194-201,
Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.
Date: 01 Aug 2010

Immigration, Acculturation and Chronic Back and Neck Problems Among Latino-Americans

Abstract

Higher acculturation is associated with increased obesity and depression among Latino-Americans, but not much is known about how acculturation is related to their prevalence of back and neck problems. This study examines whether acculturation is associated with the 12-month prevalence of self-reported chronic back or neck problems among US-born and immigrant Latinos. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis of data from 2,553 noninstitutionalized Latino adults from the 2002–2003 National Latino and Asian American Survey (NLAAS). After adjusting for demographic, physical and mental health indicators, English proficiency, nativity and higher generational status were all significantly positively associated with the report of chronic back or neck problems. Among immigrants, the proportion of lifetime in the US was not significantly associated. Our findings suggest that the report of chronic back or neck problems is higher among more acculturated Latino-Americans independent of health status, obesity, and the presence of depression.