Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 385–394

Explanatory Models of Health and Disease Among South Asian Immigrants in Chicago

Authors

    • National Committee for Quality Assurance
  • David W. Baker
    • Institute for Healthcare StudiesNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
    • Division of General Internal MedicineNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • Gregory T. Makoul
    • Division of General Internal MedicineNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
    • St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center
  • Neerja Khurana
    • Division of General Internal MedicineNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • Muhammad W. Paracha
    • Asian Human Services Family Health Center, Inc.
  • Namratha R. Kandula
    • Institute for Healthcare StudiesNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
    • Division of General Internal MedicineNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
    • St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-009-9304-1

Cite this article as:
Tirodkar, M.A., Baker, D.W., Makoul, G.T. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2011) 13: 385. doi:10.1007/s10903-009-9304-1

Abstract

To identify concepts of health and disease as part of a study on designing culturally-targeted heart disease prevention messages for South Asians. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews in English, Hindi and Urdu with 75 respondents from a federally qualified health center and at a community center for South Asian immigrants in Chicago, Illinois. Age ranged from 20 to 70 years; 60% were women; 60% held advanced degrees; 70% migrated to the US in the last 10 years; and 60% of the interviews were in Hindi or Urdu. Concepts of health and disease fell into four domains: behavioral, physical, psycho-social and spiritual. Muslim participants consistently evoked spiritual factors such as faith and prayer. Women more frequently included performing home duties and positive affect in their concept of health. Men more frequently cited behavioral factors such as smoking and drinking as the cause of disease. Many South Asians have a holistic conceptualization of health and disease, incorporating spiritual, physical and psycho-social factors. Health promotion strategies aimed at South Asians in the US should take into account this holistic model of health and disease, while also recognizing that variations exist within South Asians, by gender and religion.

Keywords

South AsiansImmigrant healthConcepts of healthConcepts of disease

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010