Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 211–221

Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among South Asian Women in New York City

  • Nadia Islam
  • Simona C. Kwon
  • Ruby Senie
  • Navneet Kathuria
Asians and Asian Americans

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-006-9325-y

Cite this article as:
Islam, N., Kwon, S.C., Senie, R. et al. J Immigrant Health (2006) 8: 211. doi:10.1007/s10903-006-9325-y

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to document the breast and cervical cancer screening practices of a community sample of South Asian women living in the New York City area. A convenience sample of 98 women was engaged in face-to-face interviews regarding their socio-demographic characteristics and cancer screening utilization. Sixty-seven percent of women had ever had a Pap test; 54% had one in the last 3 years. Seventy percent of women over 40 had ever had a mammogram; 56% had one in the last 2 years. Sixty-six percent of women had knowledge of breast self-exam (BSE); 34% of women ever practiced BSE. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that insurance status was a significant predictor of ever having a Pap test or mammogram, receiving timely Pap tests, and ever practicing BSE. Education was a significant predictor of ever having a Pap test and having knowledge of BSE. Marital status was a predictor of receiving timely Pap tests, and having spent more time in the U.S. was a predictor of ever practicing BSE. The study concludes that increased educational efforts must be developed targeting immigrant South Asian women of low socioeconomic status with limited access to healthcare.

Keywords

South Asian cancer screening access to healthcare underserved immigrants 

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadia Islam
    • 1
    • 5
  • Simona C. Kwon
    • 2
  • Ruby Senie
    • 3
  • Navneet Kathuria
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for the Study of Asian American HealthNYU School of MedicineNew York City
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimore
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew York City
  4. 4.Cogent HealthcareNew York City
  5. 5.Center for the Study of Asian American HealthNYU School of MedicineNew York City

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