Journal of Community Health

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 99–107

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Older Vietnam-Born Australians

  • Duong Thuy Tran
  • Louisa R. Jorm
  • Maree Johnson
  • Hilary Bambrick
  • Sanja Lujic
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-013-9745-2

Cite this article as:
Tran, D.T., Jorm, L.R., Johnson, M. et al. J Community Health (2014) 39: 99. doi:10.1007/s10900-013-9745-2

Abstract

Vietnamese immigrants in Australia represent the second largest Vietnamese community in developed countries, following the United States. However, limited information is available about prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relative roles of socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and Vietnamese ethnicity per se in this population. This study investigated the prevalence of T2D and its risk factors in older Vietnam-born Australians, in comparison to native-born Australians. The study used baseline questionnaire data from 787 Vietnam- and 196,866 Australia-born individuals (≥45 years), who participated in the 45 and Up Study, which is Australia’s largest population-based cohort study. Country of birth specific prevalence of T2D and its risk factors were age-standardised to the 2006 Australian population (≥45 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were built for each group to assess the relationship between T2D and socio-demographic characteristics, family history of diabetes, lifestyle factors and health status. Compared to Australia-born counterparts, Vietnam-born individuals had significantly (p < 0.001) higher age-standardised prevalence of T2D (14.7 vs 7.4 %) and significantly (p < 0.001) lower levels of vegetable consumption (≥5 serves/day, 19.4 vs 33.5 %), physical activity (≥5 sessions/week, 68.7 vs 78.5 %) and overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2, 21.5 vs 62.7 %). The increased risk of T2D associated with a family history of diabetes for Vietnam-born people [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 7.14, 95 % CI 4.15–12.28] was almost double that for Australia-born people (OR 3.77, 95 % CI 3.63–3.90). The patterns of association between T2D and other factors were similar between the two groups. The findings suggest a genetic predisposition to T2D in people of Vietnamese ethnicity. Reducing lifestyle risk factors for diabetes and better management of diabetes are priorities for Vietnam-born populations.

Keywords

AustraliaDiabetes type 2ImmigrantsPrevalenceRisk factorsVietnamese

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Duong Thuy Tran
    • 1
  • Louisa R. Jorm
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maree Johnson
    • 3
  • Hilary Bambrick
    • 1
  • Sanja Lujic
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Health Research, School of MedicineUniversity of Western SydneyPenrithAustralia
  2. 2.The Sax InstituteHaymarketAustralia
  3. 3.School of Nursing and MidwiferyUniversity of Western SydneyPenrithAustralia