Journal of Community Health

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 724–726

Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis in the Country of Georgia, 2006–2010

  • Maia Butsashvili
  • George Kandelaki
  • Medea Eloshvili
  • Rusudan Chlikadze
  • Paata Imnadze
  • Nata Avaliani
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-013-9670-4

Cite this article as:
Butsashvili, M., Kandelaki, G., Eloshvili, M. et al. J Community Health (2013) 38: 724. doi:10.1007/s10900-013-9670-4

Abstract

Bacterial meningitis remains important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in developing countries. This study analyzed the data from sentinel surveillance for bacterial meningitis among children <5 years of age hospitalized in largest children’s hospital in Tbilisi, capital of Georgia and adult patients hospitalized in infectious diseases hospital during 2006–2010 with suspected bacterial meningitis. The surveillance is conducted by National Center for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDCPH). The number of patients with identified organism was 127 (19 %). In the subsample of patients with laboratory confirmed bacterial meningitis Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated organism (67 cases, 52.8 %), followed by. influenza (17 cases, 13.4 %) and Neisseria meningitidis (16 cases, 12.6 %). The number of patients with suspected TB meningitis was 27 (21.3 %). The overall case fatality rate in the subgroup of patients with identified organism was 12.3 %. The highest mortality was observed among TB patients (22.2 %) with 14.3 % mortality for N. meningitidis and 10.3 % for S. pneumoniae. No lethal outcome was observed among patients with Haemophilus influenzae.

Keywords

Bacterial meningitis H. influenzae N. meningitides S. pneumoniae 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maia Butsashvili
    • 1
  • George Kandelaki
    • 1
  • Medea Eloshvili
    • 1
  • Rusudan Chlikadze
    • 1
  • Paata Imnadze
    • 1
  • Nata Avaliani
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Diseases Control and Public HealthTbilisiGeorgia