Journal of Community Health

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 443–450

Health Information During the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: Did the Amount Received Influence Infection Prevention Behaviors?

Authors

    • Center for Management of Complex Chronic CareHines VA Hospital
    • Spinal Cord Injury Quality Enhancement Research InitiativeHines VA Hospital
  • Sherri L. LaVela
    • Center for Management of Complex Chronic CareHines VA Hospital
    • Spinal Cord Injury Quality Enhancement Research InitiativeHines VA Hospital
    • Institute for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of MedicineNorthwestern University
  • Scott Miskevics
    • Center for Management of Complex Chronic CareHines VA Hospital
    • Spinal Cord Injury Quality Enhancement Research InitiativeHines VA Hospital
  • Barry Goldstein
    • Spinal Cord Injury Quality Enhancement Research InitiativeHines VA Hospital
    • VA Puget Sound Healthcare System
    • Department of Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of Washington
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-012-9647-8

Cite this article as:
Etingen, B., LaVela, S.L., Miskevics, S. et al. J Community Health (2013) 38: 443. doi:10.1007/s10900-012-9647-8

Abstract

In the wake of uncertainty due to the H1N1 influenza pandemic, amount and sources of H1N1-related information were examined in a cohort at high-risk for respiratory complications. Factors associated with adequate amount of information were identified. A cross-sectional mailed survey was conducted in 2010 with veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders. Bivariate comparisons assessed adequate H1N1-realted information versus not enough and too much. Multivariate regression identified variables associated with receipt of adequate information. A greater proportion who received adequate versus not enough information received H1N1 vaccination (61.87 vs. 48.49 %, p < 0.0001). A greater proportion who received adequate versus too much information received seasonal vaccination (84.90 vs. 71.02 %, p < 0.0001) and H1N1 vaccination (61.87 vs. 42.45 %, p < 0.0001). Variables associated with greater odds of receiving adequate information included being white, a college graduate, and having VA health professionals as their primary information source. Receiving adequate information was associated with lower odds of staying home with flu/flu-like symptoms, and higher odds of H1N1 vaccine receipt and wearing a facemask. Receiving appropriate amounts of information from valid sources may impact adherence to infection control recommendations during pandemics. Findings can be used to facilitate efforts ensuring information is received by high-risk populations.

Keywords

H1N1 influenzaVaccinePandemicVeteranSpinal cord injuries

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2012