Journal of Community Health

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 1071–1080

Ethnic Differences in Prevalence and Barriers of HBV Screening and Vaccination Among Asian Americans

  • Carol Strong
  • Sunmin Lee
  • Miho Tanaka
  • Hee-Soon Juon
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-012-9541-4

Cite this article as:
Strong, C., Lee, S., Tanaka, M. et al. J Community Health (2012) 37: 1071. doi:10.1007/s10900-012-9541-4

Abstract

Our study identifies the prevalence of HBV virus (HBV) screening and vaccination among Asian Americans, and ethnic differences for factors associated with screening and vaccination behaviors. In 2009–2010 we recruited 877 Korean, Chinese, and Vietnamese Americans 18 years of age and above through several community organizations, churches and local ethnic businesses in Maryland for a health education intervention and a self-administered survey. Prevalence of HBV screening, screening result and vaccinations were compared by each ethnic group. We used logistic regression analysis to understand how sociodemographics, familial factors, patient-, provider-, and resource-related barriers are associated with screening and vaccination behaviors, using the total sample and separate analysis for each ethnic group. Forty-seven percent of participants reported that they had received HBV screening and 38% had received vaccinations. Among the three groups, the Chinese participants had the highest screening prevalence, but lowest self-reported infection rate; Vietnamese has the lowest screening and vaccination prevalence. In multivariate analysis, having better knowledge of HBV, and family and physician recommendations was significantly associated with screening and vaccination behaviors. Immigrants who had lived in the US for more than a quarter of their lifetime were less likely to report ever having been screened (OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.28–0.55) or vaccinated (OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.44–0.88). In ethnic-specific analysis, having a regular physician (OR = 4.46, 95% CI: 1.62–12.25) and doctor’s recommendation (OR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.05–4.22) are significantly associated with Korean’s vaccination behaviors. Health insurance was associated with vaccination behaviors only among Vietnamese (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.21–5.83), but not among others.

Keywords

HBV infectionAsian AmericansHBV prevalenceHealth care access barriers

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol Strong
    • 1
  • Sunmin Lee
    • 2
  • Miho Tanaka
    • 3
  • Hee-Soon Juon
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of SociologyAcademia SinicaNankangTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of Maryland School of Public HealthCollege ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health, Behavior and SocietyJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA