Journal of Community Health

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 165–175

Safety Practices in Relation to Home Ownership Among Urban Mexican Immigrant Families

Authors

    • Department of Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine Residency Program, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado
    • Colorado Injury Control Research Center
  • Cynthia W. Goss
    • Department of Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine Residency Program, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado
    • Colorado Injury Control Research Center
  • Lihong Dao
    • Department of Biostatistics, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado
  • Amanda Allshouse
    • Department of Biostatistics, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado
  • Robert A. Bardwell
    • Bardwell Consulting Ltd.
  • Edward Hendrikson
    • Salud Family Health Centers
  • Shelly L. Miller
    • Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Colorado Boulder
  • Jill Litt
    • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-011-9432-0

Cite this article as:
DiGuiseppi, C., Goss, C.W., Dao, L. et al. J Community Health (2012) 37: 165. doi:10.1007/s10900-011-9432-0

Abstract

We examined home safety hazards, comparing renter- to owner-occupied housing among urban, immigrant Mexican families. Methods: Interviews and home inspections were conducted among urban, Spanish-speaking immigrant families with children. We estimated weighted hazard prevalence and used logistic regression to compare owner- and renter-occupied homes. Of 313 eligible households, 250 (80%) enrolled. Respondents were predominantly Mexican-born (99%), low income (72.6%) and lower education (92.3%). Most homes had fire, burn, fall, poisoning, electrocution and fire escape hazards, including high tap water temperatures (76.4%; 95% CI: 69.0, 83.7%), no working smoke alarms (60.0%; 51.3, 68.8%), slippery bathtub/shower surfaces (58.7%; 49.9, 67.5%), blocked fire escape routes (55.9%; 47.2, 64.5%) and child-accessible medications (71.0%; 60.1, 81.3%). After adjustment for sociodemographics, fire escape (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.8, 27.7), carbon monoxide poisoning (OR = 2.9; 1.4, 6.2) and drowning (OR = 3.5; 1.3, 9.4) hazards were more likely in owner- than renter-occupied homes. Housing age and type explained most differences. Many urban, immigrant Spanish-speaking families live in unsafe homes. For this population, housing safety programs should be targeted based on housing age and type rather than tenure.

Keywords

Home safetyMexican immigrantsHome ownershipLow income

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011