Journal of Community Health

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 113–118

Availability of Tobacco and Alcohol Products in Los Angeles Community Pharmacies

  • Robin L. Corelli
  • Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
  • Gilwan Kim
  • Peter J. Ambrose
  • Karen Suchanek Hudmon
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-011-9424-0

Cite this article as:
Corelli, R.L., Aschebrook-Kilfoy, B., Kim, G. et al. J Community Health (2012) 37: 113. doi:10.1007/s10900-011-9424-0

Abstract

The availability of tobacco and alcohol products in community pharmacies contradicts the pharmacists’ Code of Ethics and presents challenges for a profession that is overwhelmingly not in favor of the sale of these products in its practice settings. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of pharmacies that sell tobacco products and/or alcoholic beverages and to characterize promotion of these products. The proportion of pharmacies that sell non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products as aids to smoking cessation also was estimated. Among 250 randomly-selected community pharmacies in Los Angeles, 32.8% sold cigarettes, and 26.0% sold alcohol products. Cigarettes were more likely to be available in traditional chain pharmacies and grocery stores than in independently-owned pharmacies (100% versus 10.8%; P < 0.001), and traditional chain drug stores and grocery stores were more likely to sell alcoholic beverages than were independently-owned pharmacies (87.5% vs. 5.4%; P < 0.001). Thirty-four (41.5%) of the 82 pharmacies that sold cigarettes and 47 (72.3%) of the 65 pharmacies that sold alcohol also displayed promotional materials for these products. NRT products were merchandised by 58% of pharmacies. Results of this study suggest that when given a choice, pharmacists choose not to sell tobacco or alcohol products.

Keywords

Tobacco salesAlcohol salesTobacco controlPharmacies

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin L. Corelli
    • 1
  • Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
    • 2
  • Gilwan Kim
    • 3
  • Peter J. Ambrose
    • 1
  • Karen Suchanek Hudmon
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of PharmacyUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, School of Public HealthYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of PharmacyPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA