Journal of Community Health

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 217–224

Development of an ESL Curriculum to Educate Chinese Immigrants About Hepatitis B

Authors

    • Cancer Prevention ProgramFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Gloria Coronado
    • Cancer Prevention ProgramFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Elizabeth Acorda
    • Cancer Prevention ProgramFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Chong Teh
    • Cancer Control Research ProgramBritish Columbia Cancer Agency
  • Shin-Ping Tu
    • Department of MedicineHarborview Medical Center
  • Yutaka Yasui
    • Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of Alberta (Clinical Sciences Building)
  • Roshan Bastani
    • Department of Health ServicesUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • T. Gregory Hislop
    • Cancer Control Research ProgramBritish Columbia Cancer Agency
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-008-9084-x

Cite this article as:
Taylor, V.M., Coronado, G., Acorda, E. et al. J Community Health (2008) 33: 217. doi:10.1007/s10900-008-9084-x

Abstract

Chinese immigrants to North America have substantially higher rates of chronic hepatitis B infection than the general population. One area for strategic development in the field of health education is the design and evaluation of English-as-a-Second language (ESL) curricula. The theoretical perspective of the Health Behavior Framework, results from a community-based survey of Chinese Canadian immigrants with limited English proficiency, and findings from focus groups of ESL instructors as well as Chinese ESL students were used to develop a hepatitis B ESL educational module. This research was conducted in Vancouver, BC. Survey data showed that less than three-fifths of the respondents had been tested for hepatitis B, and documented some important hepatitis B knowledge deficits. Further, only about one-quarter had ever received a physician recommendation for hepatitis B serologic testing. The ESL curriculum aims to both promote hepatitis B testing and improve knowledge, and includes seven different ESL exercises: Warm-up, vocabulary cards, information-gap, video, jigsaw, guided discussion, and problem/advice cards. Our quantitative and qualitative methods for curriculum development could be replicated for other health education topics and in other limited English speaking populations.

Keywords

Chinese immigrantsEnglish as a second language (ESL)Health educationHepatitis B

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008