Journal of Community Health

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 10–21

Previous Cancer Screening Behavior as Predictor of Endoscopic Colon Cancer Screening Among Women Aged 50 and Over, in NYC 2002

  • Rafael Guerrero-Preston
  • Christina Chan
  • David Vlahov
  • Maria K. Mitchell
  • Stephen B. Johnson
  • Harold Freeman
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-007-9067-3

Cite this article as:
Guerrero-Preston, R., Chan, C., Vlahov, D. et al. J Community Health (2008) 33: 10. doi:10.1007/s10900-007-9067-3

Abstract

Colon cancer screening rates in women are low. Whether screening for breast and cervical cancer is associated with colon cancer screening behavior is unknown but could provide linkage opportunities. To identify the extent to which both breast and cervical cancer screening increases uptake of colon cancer screening among women in New York City. Women at least 50 years old completed questionnaires for the New York Cancer Project. Analyses compared rates of endoscopic colon cancer screening with adherence to screening recommendations for breast and cervical cancer. Of the 3,386 women, 87.8% adhered to breast and cervical cancer screening guidelines, yet only 42.1% had received endoscopic colon cancer screening. Most women with colon cancer screening (95%) also reported past mammogram and Pap-smear. In multivariable analysis, women who adhered to the other two procedures were more likely to have had colon cancer screening than women with no prior history (OR = 4.4; CI = 2.36, 8.20), after accounting for age, race/ethnicity, insurance status, family history of cancer and income. Significant predictors of endoscopic colon cancer screening included: age over 65 years (OR = 1.63; CI = 1.23, 2.15) with 50–65 years old as the reference, any health insurance (OR = 2.18; CI = 1.52, 3.13) and a family history of cancer (OR = 1.38; CI = 1.17, 1.61). Colorectal cancer screening remains low, even among women who undergo other cancer screening tests. Opportunities to link cancer screening tests to encourage colon cancer screening merit closer attention.

Keywords

Cancer screening behaviorPredictors of colon cancer screening behaviorSocial and health care determinants

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rafael Guerrero-Preston
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Christina Chan
    • 3
  • David Vlahov
    • 3
  • Maria K. Mitchell
    • 4
  • Stephen B. Johnson
    • 5
  • Harold Freeman
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyJoseph A. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University New YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Environmental HealthJoseph A. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University New YorkUSA
  3. 3.Center for Urban Epidemiologic StudiesThe New York Academy of Medicine New YorkUSA
  4. 4.AMDeC Foundation New YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of Biomedical InformaticsColumbia University New YorkUSA
  6. 6.Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention New YorkUSA