Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 27, Issue 7, pp 647–658

Burden of Womanhood: Tamil Women’s Perceptions of Coping with Intimate Partner Violence

Authors

    • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
  • Robin Mason
    • Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Women’s College Research Institute and Women’s Mental Health ProgramUniversity of Toronto
  • Ilene Hyman
    • Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Women’s College Research Institute and Women’s Mental Health ProgramUniversity of Toronto
  • Lisa Manuel
    • Changing Lives and Family Violence Programs, Family Service Toronto
  • Helene Berman
    • Faculty of Health SciencesWestern University
  • Brenda Toner
    • Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s10896-012-9461-1

Cite this article as:
Kanagaratnam, P., Mason, R., Hyman, I. et al. J Fam Viol (2012) 27: 647. doi:10.1007/s10896-012-9461-1

Abstract

Helping women victimized by intimate partner violence (IPV) is a challenge, particularly when the women belong to diverse ethnic groups. The objective of our study was to collect information on perceptions of coping with IPV from the perspective of a specific immigrant group of women. Sixty-three women from the Tamil community in Toronto representing different generations and experiences of IPV were interviewed in focus group settings about their views of coping with IPV. Study findings suggested that their views were deeply embedded in their sociocultural context and influenced by the gender-role expectations from the community. The women showed a marked preference for “passive” modes of coping rather than “active.” Study findings have implications for the development of alternative approaches to helping ethnically diverse women deal with IPV.

Keywords

Intimate partner violenceTamil womenCopingHelp-seekingService delivery

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012