Review article

Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 113-121

Chemical Ecology of Animal and Human Pathogen Vectors in a Changing Global Climate

  • John A. PickettAffiliated withCentre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research Email author 
  • , Michael A. BirkettAffiliated withCentre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research
  • , Sarah Y. DewhirstAffiliated withCentre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research
  • , James G. LoganAffiliated withCentre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research
  • , Maurice O. OmoloAffiliated withBehavioural and Chemical Ecology Department, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe)
  • , Baldwyn TortoAffiliated withBehavioural and Chemical Ecology Department, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe)
  • , Julien PelletierAffiliated withHonorary Maeda-Duffey Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of California Davis
  • , Zainulabeuddin SyedAffiliated withHonorary Maeda-Duffey Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of California Davis
  • , Walter S. LealAffiliated withHonorary Maeda-Duffey Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of California Davis

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Abstract

Infectious diseases affecting livestock and human health that involve vector-borne pathogens are a global problem, unrestricted by borders or boundaries, which may be exacerbated by changing global climate. Thus, the availability of effective tools for control of pathogen vectors is of the utmost importance. The aim of this article is to review, selectively, current knowledge of the chemical ecology of pathogen vectors that affect livestock and human health in the developed and developing world, based on key note lectures presented in a symposium on “The Chemical Ecology of Disease Vectors” at the 25th Annual ISCE meeting in Neuchatel, Switzerland. The focus is on the deployment of semiochemicals for monitoring and control strategies, and discusses briefly future directions that such research should proceed along, bearing in mind the environmental challenges associated with climate change that we will face during the 21st century.

Keywords

Livestock Human Pathogen vector Semiochemical Climate change