Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 269–285

Video Self-Prompting and Mobile Technology to Increase Daily Living and Vocational Independence for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Sally Bereznak
  • Kevin M. Ayres
  • Linda C. Mechling
  • Jennifer L. Alexander
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10882-012-9270-8

Cite this article as:
Bereznak, S., Ayres, K.M., Mechling, L.C. et al. J Dev Phys Disabil (2012) 24: 269. doi:10.1007/s10882-012-9270-8

Abstract

Three male high school students with autism spectrum disorders participated in this study. Vocational and daily living skills were taught using video prompting via an iPhone. Specifically, using a washing machine, making noodles, and using a copy machine were taught. A multiple probe design across behaviors replicated across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Results indicate that the three participants increased performance across all behaviors by increasing the percent of steps performed independently. This study introduces a novel approach to using instructional video, in that two of the three students were able to learn how to self-prompt with the iPhone and ultimately teach themselves the target skills. Maintenance probes were also conducted and the iPhone had to be returned to all three participants for two out of three behaviors for a return to criterion levels. In addition to study limitations, implications for practice for video self-prompting are discussed.

Keywords

Video promptingSelf-PromptingAutismDaily living skillsVocational skillsTechnology

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally Bereznak
    • 1
  • Kevin M. Ayres
    • 1
  • Linda C. Mechling
    • 2
  • Jennifer L. Alexander
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.The University of North Carolina WilmingtonWilmingtonUSA