, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 358-366
Date: 13 Sep 2006

Theory of Planned Behaviour, Skin Care and Pressure Sores Following Spinal Cord Injury

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Abstract

Objectives: To use the Theory of Planned Behaviour to explore factors associated with performing skin care behaviors and the occurrence of pressure sores in people with spinal cord injury. Design: A within-group cross-sectional design was used to assess 59 people with spinal cord injury living in the community. Of these, 17 participants returned a repeat assessment allowing a longitudinal examination of the relationship between intention and actual behaviour. Methods: A measure was developed in accordance with the Theory of Planned Behaviour guidelines through interviews with people with spinal cord injury. Measures of mood and knowledge of skin care behaviour were also included. Results: The Theory of Planned Behaviour components, mood and knowledge of skin behaviours predicted intention, skin care behaviour and occurrence of pressure sores. Knowledge of skin care was negatively correlated with occurrence of pressure sores (r=−.38, p < .01). Indirect perceived control was a particularly important predictor of pressure relief, accounting for 24% of the variance. Conclusions: Psychosocial factors, including the Theory of Planned Behaviour components, predicted skin care behaviours and the occurrence of pressure sores. These findings provide empirical support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The study also carries clinical implications for skin care education for people with SCI and their families.