Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 288–296

Kinetics of IgM and IgA Antibody Response to 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination in Healthy Subjects

  • Katharina Schütz
  • Richard G. Hughes
  • Antony Parker
  • Isabella Quinti
  • Vojtech Thon
  • Monica Cavaliere
  • Martina Würfel
  • Wilhelm Herzog
  • J. Engelbert Gessner
  • Ulrich Baumann
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10875-012-9792-y

Cite this article as:
Schütz, K., Hughes, R.G., Parker, A. et al. J Clin Immunol (2013) 33: 288. doi:10.1007/s10875-012-9792-y

Abstract

Purpose

A poor antibody response of IgM and IgA antibodies upon vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides (PnPS) is discussed as independent risk factors for bronchiectasis in patients with antibody deficiency syndrome (ADS) receiving immunoglobulin replacement therapy. However, the kinetics of the specific IgM and IgA response to vaccination with multivalent pneumococcal polysaccharides requires a more detailed knowledge. In this study we aimed i) to develop a standardised multivalent PnPS-IgM and IgA-ELISA, and ii) to compare the sensitivity of the multivalent to the serotype specific antibody response, and iii) to determine the kinetics of the anti-PnPS IgM and IgA antibodies in healthy subjects.

Methods

We immunised n = 20 healthy adults with a 23-valent PnPS vaccine (Pneumovax®). The kinetics of the 23-valent antibody response was assessed for 1 year with newly developed ELISAs for IgM and IgA isotypes, along with serotype specific responses.

Results

The IgA and IgM antibody response peaked at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively. IgM antibody levels remained at a plateau (above 80 % of peak response) for 3 months. After one year, specific antibody levels were still at about 30 % of the peak response. The 23-valent antibody response yielded significantly higher responder rates than assessment of single serotypes.

Conclusion

Testing the IgM and IgA immune response to polysaccharide vaccination with a multivalent PnPS ELISA may be a feasible tool for assessment of the immune function in patient groups who receive IgG replacement therapy.

Keywords

Pneumococcal polysaccharidesvaccinationPCP-IgMPCP-IgA23 PCP ELISAPCP antibody kinetics

Supplementary material

10875_2012_9792_Fig6_ESM.gif (8 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1

Correlation between 23 PnPS antibody response pre and post vaccination. a.) Data for 23 PnPS IgM antibodies pre and 4 weeks post vaccination. b.) Data for PnPS IgA antibodies pre and 2 weeks post vaccination. The results are expressed as U/ml. Simple linear regression analysis is used (GIF 7 kb)

10875_2012_9792_MOESM1_ESM.eps (78 kb)
High resolution image (EPS 78 kb)
10875_2012_9792_Fig7_ESM.gif (13 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1

Correlation between 23 PnPS antibody response pre and post vaccination. a.) Data for 23 PnPS IgM antibodies pre and 4 weeks post vaccination. b.) Data for PnPS IgA antibodies pre and 2 weeks post vaccination. The results are expressed as U/ml. Simple linear regression analysis is used (GIF 7 kb)

10875_2012_9792_MOESM2_ESM.eps (129 kb)
High resolution image (EPS 128 kb)
10875_2012_9792_Fig8_ESM.gif (8 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1

Correlation between 23 PnPS antibody response pre and post vaccination. a.) Data for 23 PnPS IgM antibodies pre and 4 weeks post vaccination. b.) Data for PnPS IgA antibodies pre and 2 weeks post vaccination. The results are expressed as U/ml. Simple linear regression analysis is used (GIF 7 kb)

10875_2012_9792_MOESM3_ESM.eps (84 kb)
High resolution image (EPS 84 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katharina Schütz
    • 1
  • Richard G. Hughes
    • 2
  • Antony Parker
    • 2
  • Isabella Quinti
    • 3
  • Vojtech Thon
    • 4
  • Monica Cavaliere
    • 3
  • Martina Würfel
    • 5
  • Wilhelm Herzog
    • 5
  • J. Engelbert Gessner
    • 6
  • Ulrich Baumann
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic for Immunodeficiencies, Paediatric Pulmonology, Allergy and NeonatologyHanover Medical SchoolHanoverGermany
  2. 2.The Binding Site Group Ltd.BirminghamUK
  3. 3.Clinical ImmunologySapienza University of RomeRomeItaly
  4. 4.Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Medical Faculty of Masaryk UniversitySt. Anne’s University HospitalBrnoCzech Republic
  5. 5.The Binding Site Deutschland GmbHSchwetzingenGermany
  6. 6.Clinical Immunology and RheumatologyHanover Medical SchoolHanoverGermany