Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 235–240

IL-17 Contributes to the Development of Chronic Rejection in a Murine Heart Transplant Model

  • Satoshi Itoh
  • Susumu Nakae
  • Robert C. Axtell
  • Jeffrey B. Velotta
  • Naoyuki Kimura
  • Naoki Kajiwara
  • Yoichiro Iwakura
  • Hirohisa Saito
  • Hideo Adachi
  • Lawrence Steinman
  • Robert C. Robbins
  • Michael P. Fischbein
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10875-009-9366-9

Cite this article as:
Itoh, S., Nakae, S., Axtell, R.C. et al. J Clin Immunol (2010) 30: 235. doi:10.1007/s10875-009-9366-9

Abstract

Background

Although interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of infectious, autoimmune and allergic disorders, the precise role in allograft rejection remains uncertain. This study illustrates that IL-17 contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic allograft rejection.

Result

Utilizing a murine heterotopic heart transplant model system, IL-17-deficient recipient mice had decreased allograft inflammatory cell recruitment, decreased IL-6, MCP-1, and KC production, and reduced graft coronary artery disease (GCAD). Intragraft gamma delta (γδ) T cells appear to be the predominant source of IL-17 production.

Conclusion

Therefore, IL-17 neutralization may provide a potential target for novel therapeutic treatment for cardiac allograft rejection.

Keywords

IL-17graft coronary artery diseaseγδ T cell

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Satoshi Itoh
    • 1
    • 7
  • Susumu Nakae
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Robert C. Axtell
    • 5
  • Jeffrey B. Velotta
    • 1
  • Naoyuki Kimura
    • 1
  • Naoki Kajiwara
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yoichiro Iwakura
    • 6
  • Hirohisa Saito
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hideo Adachi
    • 7
  • Lawrence Steinman
    • 5
  • Robert C. Robbins
    • 1
  • Michael P. Fischbein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiothoracic SurgeryStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of Allergy and ImmunologyNational Research Institute for Child Health and DevelopmentTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Atopy Research CenterJuntendo UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Frontier Research Initiative, The Institute of Medical ScienceUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Neurology and Neurological SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  6. 6.Center for Experimental Medicine, The Institute of Medical ScienceUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Saitama Medical CenterJichi Medical UniversitySaitamaJapan