Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

, Volume 57, Issue 3, pp 255–280

An ozone depletion event in the sub-arctic surface layer over Hudson Bay, Canada

  • B. A. Ridley
  • T. Zeng
  • Y. Wang
  • E. L. Atlas
  • E. V. Browell
  • P. G. Hess
  • J. J. Orlando
  • K. Chance
  • A. Richter
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10874-007-9072-z

Cite this article as:
Ridley, B.A., Zeng, T., Wang, Y. et al. J Atmos Chem (2007) 57: 255. doi:10.1007/s10874-007-9072-z

Abstract

During the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) program, aircraft flights during April 7–11, 2000 revealed a large area air mass capped below ∼500 m altitude over Hudson Bay, Canada in which ozone was reduced from normal levels of 30–40 ppbv to as low as 0.5 ppbv. From some of the in-situ aircraft measurements, back-trajectory calculations, the tropospheric column of BrO derived from GOME satellite measurements, and results from a regional model, we conclude that the event did not originate from triggering of reactive halogen release in the sub-Arctic region of Hudson Bay but resulted from such an event occurring at higher latitudes over the islands of the northern Canada Archipelago and nearby Arctic Ocean with subsequent transport over a distance of 1,000–1,500 km to Hudson Bay. BrOx remained active during this transport despite considerable changes in the conditions of the underlying surface suggesting that chemical recycling during transport dominated any local halogen input from the surface. If all of the tropospheric column density of BrO is distributed uniformly within the surface layer, then the mixing ratio of BrO derived from the satellite measurements is at least a factor of 2–3 larger than derived indirectly from in situ aircraft measurements of the NO/NO2 ratio.

Keywords

OzoneOzone depletionBromineHudson BayArcticTOPSEGOME

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Ridley
    • 1
  • T. Zeng
    • 2
  • Y. Wang
    • 2
  • E. L. Atlas
    • 3
  • E. V. Browell
    • 4
  • P. G. Hess
    • 1
  • J. J. Orlando
    • 1
  • K. Chance
    • 5
  • A. Richter
    • 6
  1. 1.Atmospheric Chemistry DivisionNCARBoulderUSA
  2. 2.School of Earth and Atmospheric SciencesGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric ScienceUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  4. 4.Atmospheric SciencesNASA Langley Research CenterHamptonUSA
  5. 5.Harvard-Smithsonian Center for AstrophysicsCambridgeUSA
  6. 6.Institute of Environmental PhysicsUniversity of BremenBremenGermany