Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 1155–1168

Psychosocial predictors of weight regain in the weight loss maintenance trial

  • Phillip J. Brantley
  • Diana W. Stewart
  • Valerie H. Myers
  • Molly R. Matthews-Ewald
  • Jamy D. Ard
  • Janelle W. Coughlin
  • Gerald J. Jerome
  • Carmen Samuel-Hodge
  • Lillian F. Lien
  • Christina M. Gullion
  • Jack F. Hollis
  • Laura P. Svetkey
  • Victor J. Stevens
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-014-9565-6

Cite this article as:
Brantley, P.J., Stewart, D.W., Myers, V.H. et al. J Behav Med (2014) 37: 1155. doi:10.1007/s10865-014-9565-6

Abstract

This study’s purpose was to identify psychosocial predictors of weight loss maintenance in a multi-site clinical trial, following a group-based weight loss program. Participants (N = 1025) were predominately women (63 %) and 38 % were Black (mean age = 55.6 years; SD = 8.7). At 12 months, higher SF-36 mental health composite scores were associated with less weight regain (p < .01). For Black participants, an interaction existed between race and friends’ encouragement for exercise, where higher exercise encouragement was related to more weight regain (p < .05). At 30 months, friends’ encouragement for healthy eating was associated with more weight regain (p < .05), whereas higher SF-36 mental health composite scores were related to less weight regain (p < .0001). Perceived stress and select health-related quality of life indices were associated with weight regain; this relationship varied across gender, race, and treatment conditions. Temporal changes in these variables should be investigated for their impact on weight maintenance.

Keywords

Weight loss maintenance Psychosocial predictors Obesity Quality of life Social support 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip J. Brantley
    • 1
  • Diana W. Stewart
    • 2
  • Valerie H. Myers
    • 3
  • Molly R. Matthews-Ewald
    • 1
  • Jamy D. Ard
    • 4
  • Janelle W. Coughlin
    • 5
  • Gerald J. Jerome
    • 6
  • Carmen Samuel-Hodge
    • 7
  • Lillian F. Lien
    • 8
  • Christina M. Gullion
    • 9
  • Jack F. Hollis
    • 9
  • Laura P. Svetkey
    • 10
  • Victor J. Stevens
    • 9
  1. 1.Behavioral Medicine Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research CenterLouisiana State University SystemBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Disparities ResearchUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Klein Buendel, Inc.GoldenUSA
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology and PreventionWake Forest Baptist Medical CenterWinston-SalemUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.Department of KinesiologyTowson UniversityTowsonUSA
  7. 7.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health and School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  8. 8.Division of EndocrinologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  9. 9.Health Sciences Programs, Center for Health ResearchKaiser Permanente NorthwestPortlandUSA
  10. 10.Division of Nephrology and the Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism CenterDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA