Article

Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 6, pp 556-566

First online:

Effects of a cognitive behavioural treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes when added to managed care; a randomised controlled trial

  • Laura M. C. WelschenAffiliated withDepartment of General Practice, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center Email author 
  • , Patricia van OppenAffiliated withDepartment of General Practice, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical CenterDepartment of Psychiatry, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center
  • , Sandra D. M. BotAffiliated withDepartment of General Practice, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical CenterDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center
  • , Piet J. KostenseAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center
  • , Jacqueline M. DekkerAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center
  • , Giel NijpelsAffiliated withDepartment of General Practice, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center

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Abstract

Effects of a cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) in type 2 diabetes patients were studied in a randomised controlled trial. Patients were recruited from a diabetes care system (DCS). The intervention group (n = 76) received managed care from the DCS and CBT. The control group (n = 78) received managed care only. Effects on risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD), clinical characteristics, lifestyle, determinants of behaviour change, quality of life, and depression were assessed after 6 and 12 months. The intervention did not result in a significant reduction of CHD risk (difference between intervention and control group was −0.32 % (95 % CI: −2.27; 1.63). The amount of heavy physical activity increased significantly in the intervention group at 6 months [intervention versus control group was 20.14 min/day (95 % CI: 4.6; 35.70)]. Quality of life and level of depression improved as well. All effects disappeared after 6 months. No effects were found on clinical characteristics.

Keywords

Type 2 diabetes Lifestyle intervention Cognitive behavioural treatment Cardiovascular disease risk Randomised controlled trial