Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 413–426

Expectations contribute to reduced pain levels during prayer in highly religious participants

Authors

    • Danish Pain Research CenterAarhus University Hospital
    • Center of Functionally Integrative NeuroscienceAarhus University Hospital
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
    • Department of Culture and SocietyAarhus University
  • Lene Vase
    • Danish Pain Research CenterAarhus University Hospital
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
    • Department of Psychology and Behavioral SciencesAarhus University
  • Joshua Charles Skewes
    • Center of Functionally Integrative NeuroscienceAarhus University Hospital
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
    • Department of Culture and SocietyAarhus University
  • Astrid Juhl Terkelsen
    • Danish Pain Research CenterAarhus University Hospital
  • John Hansen
    • Department of Health Science and TechnologyAalborg University
  • Armin W. Geertz
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
    • Department of Culture and SocietyAarhus University
  • Andreas Roepstorff
    • Center of Functionally Integrative NeuroscienceAarhus University Hospital
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
    • Department of Culture and SocietyAarhus University
  • Troels Staehelin Jensen
    • Danish Pain Research CenterAarhus University Hospital
    • MINDLab, NeuroCampus AarhusAarhus University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-012-9438-9

Cite this article as:
Jegindø, E.E., Vase, L., Skewes, J.C. et al. J Behav Med (2013) 36: 413. doi:10.1007/s10865-012-9438-9

Abstract

Although the use of prayer as a religious coping strategy is widespread and often claimed to have positive effects on physical disorders including pain, it has never been tested in a controlled experimental setting whether prayer has a pain relieving effect. Religious beliefs and practices are complex phenomena and the use of prayer may be mediated by general psychological factors known to be related to the pain experience, such as expectations, desire for pain relief, and anxiety. Twenty religious and twenty non-religious healthy volunteers were exposed to painful electrical stimulation during internal prayer to God, a secular contrast condition, and a pain-only control condition. Subjects rated expected pain intensity levels, desire for pain relief, and anxiety before each trial and pain intensity and pain unpleasantness immediately after on mechanical visual analogue scales. Autonomic and cardiovascular measures provided continuous non-invasive objective means for assessing the potential analgesic effects of prayer. Prayer reduced pain intensity by 34 % and pain unpleasantness by 38 % for religious participants, but not for non-religious participants. For religious participants, expectancy and desire predicted 56–64 % of the variance in pain intensity scores, but for non-religious participants, only expectancy was significantly predictive of pain intensity (65–73 %). Conversely, prayer-induced reduction in pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were not followed by autonomic and cardiovascular changes.

Keywords

Pain Cognitive modulation Expectations Prayer Religious coping Autonomic nervous system

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012