Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 124–133

Purpose in life and reduced risk of myocardial infarction among older U.S. adults with coronary heart disease: a two-year follow-up

  • Eric S. Kim
  • Jennifer K. Sun
  • Nansook Park
  • Laura D. Kubzansky
  • Christopher Peterson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-012-9406-4

Cite this article as:
Kim, E.S., Sun, J.K., Park, N. et al. J Behav Med (2013) 36: 124. doi:10.1007/s10865-012-9406-4

Abstract

This study examined whether purpose in life was associated with myocardial infarction among a sample of older adults with coronary heart disease after adjusting for relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychological factors. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study—a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50—were used. Analyses were conducted on the subset of 1,546 individuals who had coronary heart disease at baseline. Greater baseline purpose in life was associated with lower odds of having a myocardial infarction during the 2-year follow-up period. On a six-point purpose in life measure, each unit increase was associated with a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of 0.73 for myocardial infarction (95% CI, 0.57–0.93, P = .01). The association remained significant after controlling for coronary heart disease severity, self-rated health, and a comprehensive set of possible confounds. Higher purpose in life may play an important role in protecting against myocardial infarction among older American adults with coronary heart disease.

Keywords

Purpose in life Heart attack Myocardial infarction Coronary heart disease Positive psychology Meaning in life 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric S. Kim
    • 1
  • Jennifer K. Sun
    • 1
  • Nansook Park
    • 1
  • Laura D. Kubzansky
    • 2
  • Christopher Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Department of Society, Human Development, and HealthHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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