Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 51–60

Attachment style and coping in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among adults living with HIV/AIDS

  • Cheryl Gore-Felton
  • Karni Ginzburg
  • Maggie Chartier
  • William Gardner
  • Jessica Agnew-Blais
  • Elizabeth McGarvey
  • Elizabeth Weiss
  • Cheryl Koopman
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-012-9400-x

Cite this article as:
Gore-Felton, C., Ginzburg, K., Chartier, M. et al. J Behav Med (2013) 36: 51. doi:10.1007/s10865-012-9400-x

Abstract

Research indicates that a significant proportion of people living with HIV/AIDS report symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Moreover, attachment style has been associated with psychological and behavioral outcomes among persons living with HIV/AIDS. Attachment style may influence the ability to cope with traumatic stress and affect PTSD symptoms. To examine the association between attachment style and coping with PTSD symptoms, we assessed 94 HIV-positive adults on self-report measures of posttraumatic stress, coping, and attachment style. In multiple regression analysis, avoidant attachment and emotion-focused coping were positively and significantly associated with greater PTSD symptomatology. Support was also found for the moderating effects of avoidant and insecure attachment styles on emotion-focused coping in relation to greater PTSD symptoms. Taken altogether, these results suggest that interventions that develop adaptive coping skills and focus on the underlying construct of attachment may be particularly effective in reducing trauma-related symptoms in adults living with HIV/AIDS.

Keywords

HIV/AIDSAttachmentPTSDStressTraumaCoping

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl Gore-Felton
    • 1
  • Karni Ginzburg
    • 2
  • Maggie Chartier
    • 3
  • William Gardner
    • 4
  • Jessica Agnew-Blais
    • 5
  • Elizabeth McGarvey
    • 6
  • Elizabeth Weiss
    • 4
  • Cheryl Koopman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical CenterStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.School of Social WorkTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.PGSP-Stanford Psy.D ConsortiumPacific Graduate School of PsychologyPalo AltoUSA
  5. 5.School of Public HealthHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  6. 6.Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA