Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 83–91

Short sleep mediates the association between long work hours and increased body mass index

Authors

    • School of PsychologyUniversity of Wollongong
  • Peter Caputi
    • School of PsychologyUniversity of Wollongong
  • Don C. Iverson
    • Illawarra Health and Medical Research InstituteUniversity of Wollongong
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-010-9287-3

Cite this article as:
Magee, C.A., Caputi, P. & Iverson, D.C. J Behav Med (2011) 34: 83. doi:10.1007/s10865-010-9287-3

Abstract

This study examined whether short sleep duration, physical activity and time spent sitting each day mediated the association between long work hours and body mass index (BMI). Participants included 16,951 middle aged Australian adults who were employed in full time work (i.e. ≥35 h a week). Data on BMI, sleep duration, work hours and other health and demographic variables were obtained through a self-report questionnaire. A multiple mediation model was tested whereby sleep duration, physical activity and amount of time spent sitting were entered as potential mediators between work hours and BMI. The results demonstrated that short sleep partially mediated the association between long work hours and increased BMI in males. In females, long work hours were indirectly related to higher BMI through short sleep. The results provide some support for the hypothesis that long work hours could contribute to obesity via a reduction in sleep duration; this warrants further investigation in prospective studies.

Keywords

ObesityBody mass indexSleepWork hoursMultiple mediation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010