Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 305–314

Early behavioral adherence predicts short and long-term weight loss in the POUNDS LOST study

  • Donald A. Williamson
  • Stephen D. Anton
  • Hongmei Han
  • Catherine M. Champagne
  • Ray Allen
  • Eric LeBlanc
  • Donna H. Ryan
  • Jennifer Rood
  • Katherine McManus
  • Nancy Laranjo
  • Vincent J. Carey
  • Catherine M. Loria
  • George A. Bray
  • Frank M. Sacks
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-010-9253-0

Cite this article as:
Williamson, D.A., Anton, S.D., Han, H. et al. J Behav Med (2010) 33: 305. doi:10.1007/s10865-010-9253-0

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to test the association of early (first 6 months) adherence related to diet, self-monitoring, and attendance with changes in adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors. This study used data from the 24-month POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for short-and long-term weight loss. A computer tracking system was used to record data on eight indicator variables related to adherence. Using canonical correlations at the 6 and 24 month measurement periods, early behavioral adherence was associated with changes in percent weight loss and waist circumference at 6 months (R = 0.52) and 24 months (R = 0.37), but was not associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels. Early dietary adherence was associated with changes in insulin at 6 months (R = 0.19), but not at 24 months (R = 0.08, ns). Early dietary adherence was not associated with changes in adiposity.

Keywords

ObesityWeight managementAdherenceComputer trackingWaist circumferenceInsulin

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald A. Williamson
    • 1
  • Stephen D. Anton
    • 1
  • Hongmei Han
    • 1
  • Catherine M. Champagne
    • 1
  • Ray Allen
    • 1
  • Eric LeBlanc
    • 1
  • Donna H. Ryan
    • 1
  • Jennifer Rood
    • 1
  • Katherine McManus
    • 2
  • Nancy Laranjo
    • 2
  • Vincent J. Carey
    • 2
  • Catherine M. Loria
    • 3
  • George A. Bray
    • 1
  • Frank M. Sacks
    • 2
  1. 1.Pennington Biomedical Research CenterLSU SystemBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.National Heart, Lung, and Blood InstituteBethesdaUSA