Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 35–44

Anger is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in low SES but not in higher SES men and women. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

Authors

  • Päivi Merjonen
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Helsinki
  • Laura Pulkki-Råback
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Helsinki
  • Sampsa Puttonen
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Helsinki
    • Finnish Institute of Occupational Health
  • Pertti Keskivaara
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Helsinki
  • Markus Juonala
    • The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity of Turku
  • Risto Telama
    • LIKES Research Center
  • Jorma Viikari
    • Department of MedicineUniversity of Turku
  • Olli T. Raitakari
    • Department of Clinical PhysiologyUniversity of Turku
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Helsinki
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-007-9131-6

Cite this article as:
Merjonen, P., Pulkki-Råback, L., Puttonen, S. et al. J Behav Med (2008) 31: 35. doi:10.1007/s10865-007-9131-6

Abstract

We investigated the associations of anger and cynicism with carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and whether these associations were moderated by childhood or adulthood socioeconomic status (SES). The participants were 647 men and 893 women derived from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Childhood SES was measured in 1980 when the participants were aged 3–18. In 2001, adulthood SES, anger, cynicism, and IMT were measured. There were no associations between anger or cynicism and IMT in the entire population, but anger was associated with thicker IMT in participants who had experienced low SES in childhood. This association persisted after adjustment for a host of cardiovascular risk factors. It is concluded that the ill health-effects of psychological factors such as anger may be more pronounced in individuals who have been exposed to adverse socioeconomic circumstances early in life.

Keywords

AtherosclerosisIntima-media thickness (IMT)CynicismAngerHostilitySocioeconomic status (SES)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007