Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 497–503

Beliefs About Treatments for HIV/AIDS and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Men Who have Sex with Men, 1997–2006

  • Seth C. Kalichman
  • Lisa Eaton
  • Denise White
  • Charsey Cherry
  • Howard Pope
  • Demetria Cain
  • Moira O. Kalichman
Kalichman

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-007-9123-6

Cite this article as:
Kalichman, S.C., Eaton, L., White, D. et al. J Behav Med (2007) 30: 497. doi:10.1007/s10865-007-9123-6

Abstract

Beliefs that HIV treatments reduce HIV transmission risks are related to increases in sexual risk behaviors, particularly unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men (MSM). Changes in unprotected anal intercourse and prevention-related treatment beliefs were recently reported for surveys of mostly white gay men collected in 1997 and 2005. The current study extends this previous research by replicating the observed changes in behaviors and beliefs in anonymous community surveys collected in 2006. Results indicated clear and consistent increases in beliefs that HIV treatments reduce HIV transmission risks and increases in unprotected anal intercourse. These changes were observed for both HIV positive and non-HIV positive men. African American men endorsed the belief that HIV treatments protect against HIV transmission to a greater degree than White men. Results show that HIV prevention messages need to be updated to educate MSM about the realities of HIV viral concentrations and HIV transmission risks.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS preventionRisk perceptionsTreatment beliefsSexual risk behavior

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seth C. Kalichman
    • 1
  • Lisa Eaton
    • 1
  • Denise White
    • 1
  • Charsey Cherry
    • 1
  • Howard Pope
    • 1
  • Demetria Cain
    • 1
  • Moira O. Kalichman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA