Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 131–142

Changes in Cancer-Related Risk Perception and Smoking Across Time in Newly-Diagnosed Cancer Patients

  • Jennifer L. Hay
  • Jamie Ostroff
  • Jack Burkhalter
  • Yuelin Li
  • Zandra Quiles
  • Alyson Moadel
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-007-9094-7

Cite this article as:
Hay, J.L., Ostroff, J., Burkhalter, J. et al. J Behav Med (2007) 30: 131. doi:10.1007/s10865-007-9094-7

We examine the bidirectional relationships between cancer risk perceptions and smoking behavior among newly diagnosed cancer patients (N=188) during hospitalization for surgical resection, and at three and 12 months subsequently. Those with higher perceptions of risk for developing another cancer at three months were most likely to abstain from smoking by twelve months. Patients were relatively accurate in their cancer risk perceptions, with relapsers and continuous smokers reporting higher levels of risk perceptions at twelve months. Finally, those who quit smoking by 12 months felt at lower risk for developing cancer by 12 months. None of these relationships were significant between baseline and three months. Results indicate that perceived risk of cancer recurrence may be clinically useful in motivating smoking cessation after the acute cancer treatment phase is over. This study justifies an expanded theoretical framework attending to the distinct, prospective influences of illness risk perceptions on health behavior, and of health behavior on illness risk perceptions.

KEY WORDS

risk perceptionshealth behavior theorysmoking cessation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Hay
    • 1
  • Jamie Ostroff
    • 1
  • Jack Burkhalter
    • 1
  • Yuelin Li
    • 1
  • Zandra Quiles
    • 1
  • Alyson Moadel
    • 2
  1. 1.Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Population HealthBronxUSA