Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 1–10

Hostility, Anger, and Marital Adjustment: Concurrent and Prospective Associations with Psychosocial Vulnerability

  • Kelly Glazer Baron
  • Timothy W. Smith
  • Jonathan Butner
  • Jill Nealey-Moore
  • Melissa W. Hawkins
  • Bert N. Uchino
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-006-9086-z

Cite this article as:
Baron, K.G., Smith, T.W., Butner, J. et al. J Behav Med (2007) 30: 1. doi:10.1007/s10865-006-9086-z

Hostility may contribute to risk for disease through psychosocial vulnerability, including the erosion of the quality of close relationships. This study examined hostility, anger, concurrent ratings of the relationship, and change in marital adjustment over 18 months in 122 married couples. Wives’ and husbands’ hostility and anger were related to concurrent ratings of marital adjustment and conflict. In prospective analyses, wives’ but not husbands’ hostility and anger were related to change in marital adjustment. In hierarchical regression and SEM models wives’ anger was a unique predictor of both wives’ and husbands’ change in marital adjustment. The association between wives’ anger and change in husbands’ marital satisfaction was mediated by husbands’ ratings of conflict in the marriage. These results support the role of hostility and anger in the development of psychosocial vulnerability, but also suggest an asymmetry in the effects of wives’ and husbands’ trait anger and hostility on marital adjustment.

KEY WORDS

hostility anger marital adjustment psychosocial vulnerability 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly Glazer Baron
    • 1
  • Timothy W. Smith
    • 1
  • Jonathan Butner
    • 1
  • Jill Nealey-Moore
    • 1
  • Melissa W. Hawkins
    • 1
  • Bert N. Uchino
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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