Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 401–410

HIV Treatment Beliefs and Sexual Transmission Risk Behaviors among HIV Positive Men and Women

  • Seth C. Kalichman
  • Lisa Eaton
  • Demetria Cain
  • Charsey Cherry
  • Howard Pope
  • Moira Kalichman
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-006-9066-3

Cite this article as:
Kalichman, S., Eaton, L., Cain, D. et al. J Behav Med (2006) 29: 401. doi:10.1007/s10865-006-9066-3

Abstract

People are living longer and healthier with HIV infection because of successful combination antiretroviral therapies. HIV treatment beliefs are often associated with sexual practices among people living with HIV/AIDS but these associations may depend on the HIV status of sex partners. In a sample of 158 HIV positive men and women who were receiving HIV treatments, we examined the association between HIV treatment beliefs, HIV transmission risk perceptions, medication adherence, viral load and engaging in unprotected intercourse with any sex partners and specifically with sex partners who were not HIV positive (non-concordant). Results showed having missed medications in the past two days and treatment-related beliefs were significantly associated with engaging in unprotected intercourse with all sex partners as well as non-concordant partners. However, multivariate models showed that only treatment beliefs were significantly associated with engaging in unprotected intercourse with non-concordant partners. These results extend past research by demonstrating that the HIV status of sex partners sets the context for whether prevention-related treatment beliefs are associated with HIV transmission risk behaviors among people living with HIV/AIDS.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS prevention HIV/AIDS treatment risk reduction 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seth C. Kalichman
    • 1
  • Lisa Eaton
    • 1
  • Demetria Cain
    • 1
  • Charsey Cherry
    • 1
  • Howard Pope
    • 1
  • Moira Kalichman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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