Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 69–78

Association of Social Problem Solving With Glycemic Control in a Sample of Urban African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

  • Felicia Hill-Briggs
  • Tiffany L. Gary
  • Hsin-Chieh Yeh
  • Marian Batts-Turner
  • Neil R. Powe
  • Christopher D. Saudek
  • Frederick L. Brancati
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-005-9037-0

Cite this article as:
Hill-Briggs, F., Gary, T.L., Yeh, HC. et al. J Behav Med (2006) 29: 69. doi:10.1007/s10865-005-9037-0

The Social Problem-Solving Inventory—Revised, Short Form, was administered to 65 urban African Americans with type 2 diabetes to examine association of generic problem-solving styles and orientation with hemoglobin A1C (A1C). Eighty-five percent of participants had total social problem-solving scores in the Average range or higher. In linear regression models adjusted for education, each interquartile increase in impulsive/careless score was associated with a 0.82 increase in A1C (%) (p = 0.01), and each interquartile increase in avoidant score was associated with a 1.62 increase in A1C (%) (p = 0.004). After adjusting for depressive symptoms, the association of impulsive/careless style with A1C was attenuated, while the association of avoidant problem solving with A1C remained significant (p = 0.01). Associations of rational problem-solving style, positive orientation, and negative orientation with A1C and health behaviors were not statistically significant. Ineffective problem-solving styles may prove to be important targets for intervention to improve glycemic control.

KEY WORDS:

self-management minorities health behaviors disease control problem solving 

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Felicia Hill-Briggs
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Tiffany L. Gary
    • 3
  • Hsin-Chieh Yeh
    • 3
  • Marian Batts-Turner
    • 1
  • Neil R. Powe
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Christopher D. Saudek
    • 1
  • Frederick L. Brancati
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Policy and ManagementJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Division of General Internal Medicine2024 E. Monument Street, Suite 2-600BaltimoreUSA

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