Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 7, pp 1627–1637

Premixed injectable calcium phosphate cement with excellent suspension stability

Authors

    • The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor EngineeringEast China University of Science and Technology
    • Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and EngineeringEast China University of Science and Technology
  • Yuhao Mao
    • Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of EducationEast China University of Science and Technology
    • The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor EngineeringEast China University of Science and Technology
    • Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and EngineeringEast China University of Science and Technology
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-013-4920-7

Cite this article as:
Chen, F., Mao, Y. & Liu, C. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2013) 24: 1627. doi:10.1007/s10856-013-4920-7

Abstract

Premixed injectable calcium phosphate cement (p-ICPC) pastes have advantages over aqueous injectable calcium phosphate cement (a-ICPC) because p-ICPC remain stable during storage and harden only after placement into the defect. This paper focused on the suspension stability of p-ICPC paste by using fumed silica as a stabilizing agent and propylene glycol (PEG) as a continuous phase. Multiple light scanning techniques were first applied to evaluate the suspension stability. The results indicated that fumed silica effectively enhanced the suspension stability of p-ICPC pastes. The stabilizing effect of fumed silica results from the network structure formed in PEG because of its thixotropy. The p-ICPC could be eventually hydrated to form hydroxyapatite under aqueous circumstances by the unique replacement between water and PEG. p-ICPC (1) not only possesses proper thixotropy and compressive strength but has good injectability as well. p-ICPC (1) was cytocompatible and had no adverse effect on the attachment and proliferation of MG-63 cells in vitro. These observations may have applicability to the development of other nonaqueous injectable biomaterials for non-immediate filling and long-term storage.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013