Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 23, Issue 9, pp 2203–2215

Biointerface: protein enhanced stem cells binding to implant surface

  • W. Chrzanowski
  • A. Kondyurin
  • Jae Ho Lee
  • Megan S. Lord
  • M. M. M. Bilek
  • Hae-Won Kim
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-012-4687-2

Cite this article as:
Chrzanowski, W., Kondyurin, A., Lee, J.H. et al. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2012) 23: 2203. doi:10.1007/s10856-012-4687-2

Abstract

The number of metallic implantable devices placed every year is estimated at 3.7 million. This number has been steadily increasing over last decades at a rate of around 8 %. In spite of the many successes of the devices the implantation of biomaterial into tissues almost universally leads to the development of an avascular sac, which consists of fibrous tissue around the device and walls off the implant from the body. This reaction can be detrimental to the function of implant, reduces its lifetime, and necessitates repeated surgery. Clearly, to reduce the number of revision surgeries and improve long-term implant function it is necessary to enhance device integration by modulating cell adhesion and function. In this paper we have demonstrated that it is possible to enhance stem cell attachment using engineered biointerfaces. To create this functional interface, samples were coated with polymer (as a precursor) and then ion implanted to create a reactive interface that aids the binding of biomolecules—fibronectin. Both AFM and XPS analyses confirmed the presence of protein layers on the samples. The amount of protein was significant greater for the ion implanted surfaces and was not disrupted upon washing with detergent, hence the formation of strong bonds with the interface was confirmed. While, for non ion implanted surfaces, a decrease of protein was observed after washing with detergent. Finally, the number of stem cells attached to the surface was enhanced for ion implanted surfaces. The studies presented confirm that the developed bionterface with immobilised fibronectin is an effective means to modulate stem cell attachment.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Chrzanowski
    • 1
  • A. Kondyurin
    • 2
  • Jae Ho Lee
    • 3
  • Megan S. Lord
    • 5
  • M. M. M. Bilek
    • 2
  • Hae-Won Kim
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.The Faculty of PharmacyThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.School of Physics University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Institute of Tissue Regenerative Engineering (ITREN)Dankook UniversityCheonanRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Nanobiomedical Science Research CenterDankook UniversityCheonanRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Graduate School of Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia