Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 22, Issue 12, pp 2599–2605

Analysis of sintered polymer scaffolds using concomitant synchrotron computed tomography and in situ mechanical testing

Authors

  • A. Dhillon
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
  • P. Schneider
    • Institute for BiomechanicsETH Zurich
  • G. Kuhn
    • Institute for BiomechanicsETH Zurich
  • Y. Reinwald
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
  • L. J. White
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
  • A. Levchuk
    • Institute for BiomechanicsETH Zurich
  • F. R. A. J. Rose
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
  • R. Müller
    • Institute for BiomechanicsETH Zurich
  • K. M. Shakesheff
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
    • Division of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering, Centre for Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of Nottingham
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-011-4443-z

Cite this article as:
Dhillon, A., Schneider, P., Kuhn, G. et al. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2011) 22: 2599. doi:10.1007/s10856-011-4443-z

Abstract

The mechanical behaviour of polymer scaffolds plays a vital role in their successful use in bone tissue engineering. The present study utilised novel sintered polymer scaffolds prepared using temperature-sensitive poly(dl-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ethylene glycol) particles. The microstructure of these scaffolds was monitored under compressive strain by image-guided failure assessment (IGFA), which combined synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) and in situ micro-compression. Three-dimensional CT data sets of scaffolds subjected to a strain rate of 0.01%/s illustrated particle movement within the scaffolds with no deformation or cracking. When compressed using a higher strain rate of 0.02%/s particle movement was more pronounced and cracks between sintered particles were observed. The results from this study demonstrate that IGFA based on simultaneous SR CT imaging and micro-compression testing is a useful tool for assessing structural and mechanical scaffold properties, leading to further insight into structure–function relationships in scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011