Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 399–404

The effects of nanoscale pits on primary human osteoblast adhesion formation and cellular spreading

  • M. J. P. Biggs
  • R. G. Richards
  • N. Gadegaard
  • C. D. W. Wilkinson
  • M. J. Dalby
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-006-0705-6

Cite this article as:
Biggs, M.J.P., Richards, R.G., Gadegaard, N. et al. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2007) 18: 399. doi:10.1007/s10856-006-0705-6

Abstract

Current understanding of the mechanisms involved in ossesoinegration following implantation of a biomaterial has led to an emphasis being placed on the modification of material topography to control interface reactions. Recent studies have inferred nanoscale topography as an important mediator of cell adhesion and differentiation. Biomimetic strategies in orthopaedic research aim to exploit these influences to regulate cellular adhesion and subsequent bony tissue formation. Here experimental topographies of nanoscale pits demonstrating varying order have been fabricated by electron-beam lithography in (poly)carbonate. Osteoblast adhesion to these nanotopographies was ascertained by quantification of the relation between adhesion complex formation and total cell area. This study is specifically concerned with the effects these nanotopographies have on adhesion formation in S-phase osteoblasts as identified by BrdU incorporation. Nanopits were found to reduce cellular spreading and adhesion formation.

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. P. Biggs
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. G. Richards
    • 2
  • N. Gadegaard
    • 1
  • C. D. W. Wilkinson
    • 1
  • M. J. Dalby
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Cell EngineeringInstitute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Joseph Black Building, University of GlasgowGlasgowUK
  2. 2.AO Research InstituteAO FoundationDavos PlatzSwitzerland